To view pictures and film clips please go to:
hlcpicsandvids.blogspot.com

Friday, May 29, 2009

Malama Pono and 'Ulumua


Haumana and Makua,

Take Care and move forward or progress well...that would be my translation for the Title of this Post.

Email me anytime feki54@gmail.com for some help. Use me as a resource as I have taught each of you to do. Please continue doing your very best in all you do.

You can turn in your LLE's, Book Reports and approved additions to your projects by Friday June 5th, 2009. After that I will no longer grade any items from students of Hakipu'u Learning Center.

I hope the best for each of you as you continue in life. If I have caused any undue difficulties for you (students and parents) please excuse my weaknesses and mahalo for your patience with me.

Among all that you have learned remember that your academics is best coupled with good character and wise observations. Again keep in touch and email me anytime.

And lastly Hiki Mai:

HIKI MAI E NA PUA I KA LA’IE
COME FORWARD AND APPEAR YOU PRECIOUS FLOWERS ARISING IN THE
CALMNESS OF THIS SPECIAL DAY


KE PI’I A’E LA KA MAUNA KI’EKI’E

EACH OF YOU ARE TAKING UP THE CHALLENGE OF NOT SIMPLY CLIMBING
A HIGH MOUNTAIN BUT YOU HAVE CHOSEN TO CLIMB THE HIGHEST AND
MOST MAJESTIC MOUNTAIN OF ALL


HA’A MAI NA KAMA ME KA MAKUA

DANCE FORWARD YOU CHILDREN OF YOUR HEAVENLY FATHER

HE WEHI PULAMA A’O KE KUPUNA
FOR IS IT NOT SO THAT YOU OUR CHILDREN ARE SO VERY PRECIOUS, IN
FACT, YOU ARE THE MOST PRECIOUS ADORNMENT WORN AROUND THE
NECK OF YOUR ANCESTORS


E KA’I MAI ANA E KA’I MAI ANA

COME FORWARD COME FORWARD FOR THERE ARE MANY ROADS FOR
YOU TO CHOOSE…

E HAHAI I KA LEO O KA HAKU E
BE SURE TO FOLLOW THE VOICE OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD, FOR HE WILL
ALWAYS KEEP YOU, PROTECT YOU, AND SHOW YOU THE WAY.


Aloha Nui,
Kumu Feki

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Most of our 'Ohana Blogs


to see other HLC student blogs please visit hlcbloggers.blogspot.com

kaili
451fahrenheitkaili.blogspot.com
Kakauvstattoo.blogspot.com
Kailialoha-hauntedhawaiiannights.blogspot.com

ka'imi
haleonakoareadingclass.blogspot.com
leafakatonga.blogspot.com
blueskinofthesea.blogspot.com
childerenstory.blogspot.com
kamehameha1.blogspot.com
hawaiianforce.blogspot.com

kendra
fahrenheit451kendras.blogspot.com
kendrarainwater.blogspot.com
deathbybikini.blogspot.com

lauren
drylandkalo.blogspot.com
bradbury111.blogspot.com
hauntedhawaiiannights.blogspot.com

caitlyn
absolutelypositivelynotgay.blogspot.com
hottlist.blogspot.com
elloellosmileys.blogspot.com

tama
hlcfahrenheit451.blogspot.com
pendragonbookproject.blogspot.com
hlcearthproject.blogspot.com

isaac
baconisgod.blogspot.com
suehirosan.blogspot.com
suehirosan2.blogspot.com
kamehamehawarriorkingofhawaii.blogspot.com
jamesclavellischirdrensstory.blogspot.com

kyle
bloodredsun-kamehameha.blogspot.com
childrensstorieys.blogspot.com

josh
underthebloodredsunjoshcarroll.blogspot.com
cruz4life.blogspot.com
joshdanielcarroll.blogspot.com
kamehameha123.blogspot.com
islandofthebluedolphin.blogspot.com
carroll1994.blogspot.com

ka'ainoa
groupbook1.blogspot.com
giddyupnalo.blogspot.com
bookproject1.blogspot.com

schae Ann
readingclasshaleonakoa.blogspot.com
mywrestlingexperience.blogspot.com
lovelybonesassesment.blogspot.com

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Makai Lab Assessment Tomorrow!

Aloha Kakou,

As we come to the end of the school year we prepare to finish projects and prepare for assessments such as that for our Makai lab tomorrow.

Thursday, May 21, 2009

Tama's other Reply

Dr. Bartlett,
Thank You very much for your reply. You have helped me move further into my project. I also need your help with the following question.
"What are the good and bad ways humans affect the earth?" I welcome your insight on this question. I would also ask if you could direct me to any other resources that might be helpful to me and my research.

Mahalo,
Tama Moors

P.S. I have recently started my blog. Within 15 days my blog will be up and running with lots of information. Your comments are very welcome on my blog page. The URL is http://hlcearthproject.blogspot.com/.


Tama,

There are many ways in which humans interact with the Earth. Whether
these are good or bad depends very much on the perspective we take to
our relationship with nature. We mine minerals and resources (iron,
gold, diamonds, coal, etc.) from the Earth. This processes inevitably
alters the environment and landscape in the areas where the mining
takes place (which could be viewed as bad) but also provides jobs and
the resources we require to build the many things we have today (which
could be argued is a good thing). Part of what makes making decisions
about how best to treat the Earth is the balance between the damage we
might due to the local environment and the benefits we accrue from
doing that damage. Making good decisions, in other words, is not
formulaic - it requires wisdom and communication, foresight and an
understanding of history.

Hope that helps,

Prof. Bartlett


Marshall Bartlett
Assistant Professor of Physics and Earth Sciences
******************************
******************************
*
Brigham Young University - Hawaii
Department of Biochemistry and Physical Sciences
55-220 Kulanui Street
Box 1967
Laie, HI 96762

Please give me feedback. Also I would like to ask if any of you could help me break this down and define it.

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

Ho'ike Tomorrow!


Aloha Kakou,

Please come to our Ho'ike tomorrow at 5:00pm at Hale Akoakoa on the WCC campus.

We have 9 students presenting tomorrow. They are:

Mahina
Ka'imi
Schae Ann
Kaili
Isaac
Kendra
Ka'ainoa
Lauren
Caitlyn

Great work everyone!

Friday, May 15, 2009

The Ten Sins of PowerPoint




Aloha Haumana,

Please read the following to learn more about using PowerPoint effectively.

----------------------------------------------------

http://www.utexas.edu/lbj/21cp/syllabus/powerpoint_tips2.htm

http://www.utexas.edu/lbj/21cp/syllabus/powerpoint_tips.htm
Gary Chapman, LBJ School of Public Affairs
Showing things to an audience during a speech is as old as public speaking. In nearly all cases, showing an audience a physical thing, an actual object, is the best way to engage an audience’s attention. But when this isn’t possible, presentation software like PowerPoint (or Apple’s Keynote software) allows the modern public speaker to show things to an audience on a large screen.
What has been turned upside-down over the past decade’s spread of PowerPoint, for most PowerPoint users, is that the “speech” is now mostly what’s on the screen, rather than what is spoken. In other words, the proper relation of the illustration tool to the speech has been reversed. In the opinion of many people, this has tragically damaged the art of public speaking. No one can imagine Abraham Lincoln nor Martin Luther King, Jr., needing PowerPoint. But today many people who give oral presentations cannot imagine doing so without PowerPoint.
In the interest of restoring some balance to the use of PowerPoint, without rejecting its use altogether, here are some suggestions for how to use PowerPoint effectively.


Ten Thoughts About How to Use PowerPoint Effectively

1. PowerPoint, when displayed via a projector, is a useful tool for showing audiences things that enhance what the speaker is saying. It is a useful tool for illustrating the content of a speech, such as by showing photos, graphs, charts, maps, etc., or by highlighting certain text from a speech, such as quotations or major ideas. It should not be used as a slide-show outline of what the speaker is telling the audience.

2. Slides used in a presentation should be spare, in terms of how much information is on each slide, as well as how many slides are used. A rule of thumb is to put no more than eight lines of text on a slide, and with no more than eight to ten words per line. In most cases, less is more, so four lines of text is probably better. Don’t display charts or graphs with a lot of information—if it’s useful for the audience to see such things, pass them out as handouts.

3. Unless you’re an experienced designer, don’t use the transition and animation “tricks” that are built into PowerPoint, such as bouncing or flying text. By now, most people roll their eyes when they see these things, and these tricks add nothing of value to a presentation.

4. Above all, use high-contrast color schemes so that whatever is on your slides is readable. Unless you are a talented graphic designer, use the templates that come with PowerPoint or Keynote, and keep it simple—high concept design in a slide presentation doesn’t help in most circumstances, unless you’re in the fashion or design fields. If you use graphics or photos, try to use the highest quality you can find or afford—clip art and low-resolution graphics blown up on a screen usually detract from a presentation.

5. Rehearse your PowerPoint presentation and not just once. Don’t let PowerPoint get in the way of your oral presentation, and make sure you know how it works, what sequence the slides are in, how to get through it using someone else’s computer, etc. Make sure that you can deliver your presentation if PowerPoint is completely unavailable; in other words, make sure you can give your speech without your PowerPoint presentation.

6. Get used to using black slides. There are few speeches that need something displayed on the screen all the time. If you include a black slide in your presentation, your audience will refocus on you, rather than on the screen, and you can direct them back to the screen when you have something else to show them. Put a black screen at the end of your presentation, so that when you’re done, the PowerPoint presentation is finished and off the screen.

7. Concentrate on keeping the audience focused on you, not on the screen. You can do this by using slides sparingly, standing in front of the audience in a way that makes them look at you, and, if possible, going to the screen and using your hand or arm to point out things on a slide. If you expect to be using PowerPoint a lot, invest in a remote “clicker” that lets you get away from the computer and still drive your presentation. If you don’t have one of those, it’s better to ask someone to run the presentation than to be behind a screen and keyboard while you talk.

8. If you show something on a computer that requires moving the cursor around, or flipping from one screen to another, or some other technique that requires interaction with the computer itself, remember that people in the audience will see things very differently on the projection screen than you see them on the computer screen. Keep motion on the screen to a minimum, unless you’re showing a movie or a video. It’s better to show a static screenshot of a Web page, embedded on a slide, than to call up the Web page in a browser on a computer. If you want to point out something on a Web page, go to the screen and point at it—don’t jiggle the cursor around what you want people to look at: their heads will look like bobble-headed dolls.

9. Don’t “cue” the audience that listening to your speech means getting through your PowerPoint presentation. If the audience sees that your PowerPoint presentation is the structure of your speech, they’ll start wondering how many slides are left. Slides should be used asynchronously within your speech, and only to highlight or illustrate things. Audiences are bored with oral presentations that go from one slide to the next until the end. Engage the audience, and use slides only when they are useful.

10. Learn how to give a good speech without PowerPoint. This takes practice, which means giving speeches without PowerPoint. Believe it or not, public speaking existed before PowerPoint, and many people remember it as being a lot better then than it is now. A few people use presentation software in extremely effective ways—Steve Jobs and Stanford Law Professor Lawrence Lessig are two examples. Al Gore’s use of Keynote in the movie “An Inconvenient Truth” was a good model. But these three examples don’t look at all like the way most people use PowerPoint. Avoiding bad PowerPoint habits means, first and foremost, becoming a good public speaker.


The Ten Sins of PowerPoint


1. PowerPoint is now used frequently as a speaker's "crutch," especially when the speaker is repeating or simply following what's displayed on a PowerPoint slide. This has been shown to diminish a listener's attention, and at the very least it shifts attention from the speaker to the screen, which detracts from the speaker's ability to engage with his or her audience. Speakers who simply recite what is on their PowerPoint slides are notoriously dull public speakers.

2. PowerPoint users routinely put more information on a slide than slides should display. PowerPoint is best used as a tool of illustration—to show audiences things that supplement and enhance what the speaker is saying. Unfortunately, many PowerPoint users put so much information on a single slide that the typical audience member can't read it easily, or doesn't even try. (Such slides are humorously known as "eye charts.") And the speaker has lost the audience’s attention to its frustration.

3. PowerPoint contains "tricks" of slide transition or text and graphics animation that are almost all unnecessary, distracting, and too “cute.” Tricks such as text that bounces into the screen, or shoots into the slide from the side margins, or flips upside-down, etc., add nothing to the presentation and usually detract from its professionalism.

4. Everyone has seen a PowerPoint presentation that exhibits an awful, sometimes even embarrassing, lack of design sense, especially when the presentation is displayed in low-contrast colors that make it difficult to read. Nothing destroys a presentation’s effectiveness more thoroughly than when the audience is straining to see what’s on the screen, or when people are wincing because of a bad design or color scheme.

5. PowerPoint routinely does something that trips up a speaker and suddenly the speech is stalled, or it becomes a series of mutterings about what has gone wrong with PowerPoint. When PowerPoint’s behavior gets in the way of delivering a speech, the speech has gone wrong in a way that is all too familiar.

6. Many speakers today assume, without thinking about it, that when they use PowerPoint they should have a slide on the screen during the entire presentation. Or they simply leave a slide on the screen, again without thinking about it. A common result is that the audience is forced to stare at a PowerPoint slide that has lost any connection to what is being said.

7. Because speakers who use PowerPoint often assume, again without thinking about it, that their audience will be, and should be, looking at the projector screen, they put little or no effort into their own visual engagement with the audience. “Screen accompanied by still-life of speaker” is unfortunately the most common picture of using PowerPoint for oral presentations.

8. Speakers who use a projector attached to a computer routinely forget that the sizes of the computer screen and that of the projection screen are vastly different—the latter is a multiple of the former. This means that when a speaker whips a cursor around on the computer’s screen, audience members get whiplash trying to follow the cursor around on the projection screen. Plus, what seems “normal” to do on a computer screen often looks like an incomprehensible psychedelic light show on a projection screen. Speakers who orate while simultaneously operating a computer are almost certain to lose their audience.

9. Audiences sense when a speaker is dependent on PowerPoint and they quickly grasp that the content of the speech is tied to the length of the PowerPoint presentation. This shifts the audience’s attention to how many slides there are, or, if the slides are delivered as handouts, how many slides are left to go—i.e., they are no longer listening to the speech.

10. People who use PowerPoint often think that preparing an oral presentation means preparing a PowerPoint presentation, and then delivering that, with accompanying oral commentary. Needless to say, the art of preparing a good speech is lost, or may never be developed in the first place. What PowerPoint can do should not be the starting point of an effective oral presentation.

Outline for Presentations

Aloha Haumana,

Below is the text for an Outline for Presentations. Please feel Free to refer to these now and in the future at any time.

Mahalo!

-------------------------------------------------------------
See text below image...



GENERIC OUTLINE FOR ORAL PRESENTATIONS

INTRODUCTION
I. Attention-getting statement - gain the attention of the audience by using a quotation, telling a brief story or humorous anecdote, asking a question, etc.
II. Thesis statement - state the specific purpose of your presentation here.
III. Preview statement - overview of all of your main points. What you will share.

BODY
I. First main point
A. Subpoint
1. Sub-subpoint
2. Sub-subpoint
B. Subpoint
1. Sub-subpoint
2. Sub-subpoint
3. Sub-subpoint
II. Second main point
A. Subpoint
1. Sub-subpoint
2. Sub-subpoint
B. Subpoint
1. Sub-subpoint
2. Sub-subpoint
3. Sub-subpoint
C. Subpoint….

Note: The number of main points, subpoints and sub-subpoints you use will vary depending on how much information you have to convey and how much detail and supporting material you need to use. Subpoints and sub-subpoints are comprised of the supporting material you gather in your research.
****You should rarely have more than five main points in any presentation.


CONCLUSION
I. Summary statement - review all of your main points.
II. Concluding statement - prepare a closing statement that ends your presentation
smoothly.

Ho'ike Wednesday May 20th, 2009

'Ulumua

Aloha Kakou,

I hope everyone is doing well with the last two weeks of school remaining. We have many students presenting in Ho'ike this coming Wednesday the 20th of May.

The students we have presenting are:

Schae Ann - Wrestling Experience
Ka'ainoa - Independent Stores
Caitlyn - Plantations in Hawai'i
Lauren - Lo'i Kalo
Kendra - Tourism
Kaili - Kakau
Joshua - Gyotaku
Isaac - Telescopes on Mauna Kea

And we may also have Mahina and Ka'imi presenting on their trips to China and Maui with Na Hoa Aina.

We are focusing on getting in our work and I am focusing on making sure everyone is awarded credit for what they have done. I will meet with each of you to make sure we have the correct credit amounts.

Keep up the great work!
Kumu Feki
feki54@gmail.com

Monday, May 11, 2009

3 Weeks left...


Aloha Kakou,

I would like to encourage everyone to do their very best for this last stretch of school.

The items we should be focusing on are:

1. Projects (Student or Staff Driven and Malama)
2. Book Reports (.25 credit each, no maximum)
3. Lifelong Learning Experiences (.10 each, 10/year maximum)
4. Following up on any credit earned to make sure it is recorded in Project Foundry

We need to be prepared when we come to school. There are too many students who do not come prepared with our basic materials such as:

1. Student Planner
2. Writing Utensils (Pen, Pencil and other types of pens)
3. Paper or a Notebook
4. Project Binder and all notes

Also, every student needs to make sure that he/she has the Ho'ike/Presentation credit which is 3 presentations a year.

If there are any questions you may have please email me at feki54@gmail.com or call during school hours at 808-235-9155.

Mahalo Nui!
Kumu Feki

Monday, May 4, 2009

Welcome Back Mahina!!!

As well as everyone else who went on the China Excursion!!!
(with the exception of Uncle Shorty, Aunty Susan and Kamalu home on the 10th)



My Favorite Picture!!!! LOL!!!

Tama's Research on the Earth - Dr. Bartlett

Here is the email correspondence that Tama had with Dr. Marshall Bartlett a Geophysicist currently teaching at BYU - Hawai'i. Please feel free to use Tama's example in your search for information from a content expert. Aloha...

--------------------------------

On Thu, Apr 30, 2009 at 9:52 AM, Tama Moors wrote:
> Aloha Dr. Marshall Bartlett,
> My name is Tama Moors.I am 14 years old and in the 8th grade. I attend
> Hakipu'u Learning Center public charter school in Kaneohe. I am doing a
> project on how the Earth works. My teacher is Feki Po'uha and he referred
> you to me as a resource for my project. I would appreciate it if you would
> share some of your insight and expertise in response to these six questions.
> I will be using other resources to also address these questions.
>
> How does the Earth work?
>
> What is the Earth made of?
>
> What is the Earth's atmosphere made of?
>
> What are the different internal layers of the Earth and how do the work?
>
> What is the data of the Earth? (size, scientific name, age, etc)
>
> How does gravitation work?
>
> My project is only a few weeks long and as such I would request your
> response by next week or at your convenience.
>
> Mahalo.
>
> P.S. I will be posting this information on a blog. I haven't started it yet
> but when I do I will email you the blog address. Please let me know if you
> have any objections to this.
>
> Class Blog Link: haleonakoa.blogspot.com


--------------------------------



From: Marshall Bartlett
Date: Mon, May 4, 2009 at 10:55 AM
Subject: Re: Aloha!
To: Tama Moors


Tama,

Thank you for getting in touch with. I will try to answer your
questions as concisely as I can - though you are asking some tough
ones! These are questions that could easily (and do easily) fill many
volumes.

1. How does the Earth work?

The answer to this question depends, to a large extent, by what we
mean by "work". At one level, the Earth can be seen (as it often is
by geologists) as a system that produces heat internally through the
decay of radio-isotopes of Uranium, Thorium, and Potassium. This heat
is then dissipated to the exterior of the Earth through conduction,
convection, and latent heat exchange. The result of this process is
near constant motion of the surface layers of Earth in the process
known as plate tectonics. The result of all this motion includes
events such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes.

Viewed from this perspective, plate tectonics (and the associated
earthquakes, volcanoes, etc.) "work" analogous to how the radiator in
a car works to rid the engine of heat. Plate tectonics is a cooling
system for our Earth which is constantly being heated by its own
internal chemical constituents.

However, as I mentioned, this is not the only way to think about how
the Earth "works." There are also complex chemical, physical, and
biological interactions between the major Earth system components of
the geosphere, the hydrosphere, the atmosphere, the cryosphere, and
the biosphere. In many ways, these interactions are of more interest
to us as human beings since it is these systems that we depend upon
for our survival.

2. What is the Earth made of?

The Earth is similar in chemical composition to the "Terrestrial"
planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. Our planet is primarily
composed of the elements Iron (~32%), Oxygen (~30%), Silicon (~15%),
and Magnesium (~14%), with lesser amounts of all of the remaining
elements on the periodic table. Due to a long history (~4.5 Billion
Years!) of chemical evolution, the exterior parts of the Earth (where
we live) are dominated by silicate rocks, composed primarily of oxygen
and silicon. The majority of the iron in the Earth is found in its
deep interior.

3. What is the Earth's atmosphere made of?

Earth's atmosphere is composed primarily of molecular nitrogen (~78%)
and Oxygen (~21%). The remaining 1% is made of what we refer to as
"trace gases" such as Argon, Carbon Dioxide, Neon, Helium, Methane,
and several others. The Earth's atmosphere has changed radically over
the long history of Earth and is significantly influenced by the
presence of living organisms on our planet.

4. What are the different internal layers of the Earth and how do the work?

The Earth is divided along two different classification schemes; one
related to the rheology (flow characteristics) of the materials
involved and the other related to the chemical composition of the
materials. The chemical segregation into a light, buoyant crust on
the outside of the Earth overlying a denser mantle and core is a
result of gravitational separation of the materials, just like when
oil and water separate in salad dressing.

5. What is the data of the Earth? (size, scientific name, age, etc)

Rather than quote all the numbers for you, have a look at the data box
on Wikipedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth.

6. How does gravitation work?

This is a much more complicated question than it sounds! The short
answer is that we don't really know; what we do know is how to
accurately characterize the effects of gravity. There are two
competing theories in physics today for how gravity works: one
suggests that gravity results from the exchange of tiny particles
(called gravitons) between all objects that have mass; the other idea
is that gravity is a natural geometric consequence of the bending of a
"space-time-fabric" that underlies nature. Both are useful working
models of gravity but have some fundamental inconsistencies that have
yet to be worked out. Something for you to work on!

Hopefully those answers will give you enough material to get your
project up and running. There is lots of great info on the internet
(try a Google search for "Plate Tectonics" or "Earth's composition"
for example). Let me know if I can be of any more assistance.

Good luck!

Prof. Bartlett


Marshall Bartlett
Assistant Professor of Physics and Earth Sciences
*************************************************************
Brigham Young University - Hawaii
Department of Biochemistry and Physical Sciences
55-220 Kulanui Street
Box 1967
Laie, HI 96762

email: bartletm@byuh.edu
phone: (808)675-3812
fax: (808)675-3825
*************************************************************

Tuesday, April 21, 2009

This Week...

Aloha Kakou,

This week's events include testing today and Thursday of all students with either HSA or SAT testing.

Also this week we have some students touring China. Mahina will be representing our 'ohana.


This is a picture of a Summer Palace in China which Mahina did a project on.

Congrats to some students who have completed some projects recently.
They include:

Kendra - Tourism and the Economy
Caitlyn - Change in Plantation life
Ka'imi - Summer Ho'olauna Project
Lauren - Bodysurfing
Kaili - Tattoo

We also have students who have completed LLE's and who will soon complete Book Reports.

The four main focuses I have for each student is:

1. Regular Project
2. Malama Project
3. LLE's (10 max)
4. Book Report (.25 each with no limit)

Other focuses which are important for gaining credit include:

- Math
- Basic Skills Workshops
- Electives
- Mauka / Makai Lab
- In-class reading project

Tuesday, April 7, 2009

Welcome Back from Spring Break!

Welcome Back Everyone!

Hope your break was enjoyable. I will post some pics up later showing what I did for my break.

Please take note of the Malama PPF, Blog Rubric, and Phase One packet in two format on the left column of this blog. Click on it and use the appropriate forms.

And also take note of the blogs of our haumana!

Kumu Feki

Wednesday, March 11, 2009

ANNOUNCEMENT: I hate when students use "now days" in writing...

Please use words such as currently, recently, modern, and up to date.


Mahalo!


Monday, March 9, 2009

A full day of project work tomorrow...

Aloha Kakou,

For the few of our 'ohana who were in class today there was great work accomplished.

- Ka'imi is almost ready to have her pre-evaluation
- Lauren is working on finishing his paper
- Josh and Isaac are working on their Project Proposal Request (PPF) form and subsequent Pre-eval
- Mahina got the standards she needs to start a new project on science and foundational standards and benchmarks.
- Kaili was working with the Music course with Uncle Cal.
- Schae Ann and Caitlyn were working on their 'Olelo certification

Please keep up the good work and be prepared for tomorrow's full day of project work.

Bring your planners, pens/pencils, project binders, and a ready mind.

Also today we were instructed in Kupo'ai on respect we should give to ourselves and others. Please do not engage in abusive acts amongst ourselves and others.

Aloha

Wednesday, March 4, 2009

Makai Lab Today...

It was a memorable experience today. Some of us who went out to the Ko'a had a great experience. Those who stayed on the 'aina learned a lot as well. And the Volleyball game was very memorable, especially Kumu Kala's doing the splits to save the volleyball.

Please remember your assignment from Aunty Charlene:

GET AN ARTICLE ABOUT LIMU, VOYAGING OR TAKING CARE OF THE LAND. READ IT AND BRING IT TO MAKAI LAB NEXT WEEK.

Some of us need to remember our materials for Makai lab.

Tuesday, March 3, 2009

Kyle's Mana'o on the HLC Values

Aloha My Name is Kyle. This is my project on Hakipu'u Learning Center's core values. I got my resources from: The Project-based learning handbook, through an interview conducted by Schae Ann with Kumu Kala and through other internet resources such as wehewehe.org.

Here is a list of the values as aforementioned and I have included what I interpret the values to mean in my life. As with all things and all people I am continually trying to emulate these values as well as others.

Please enjoy!


Kulia i ka Nu'u

Strive for the Highest


I live this by going above and beyond. Like if Im doing something I try to go pass what is expected of me. Some things that prevent me from doing this is talking to my friends because then I get off task. That is only during school time.



Kupono
Stand in righteousness and integrity


I live this by acting appropriate in the setting you are at. I also live this by remembering there is a time and place for everything. Another example of Kupono is when you are in class, do not play around and when you are on break/recess don't forget to play around.



Kuleana
Responsibility


I live this by being responsible for my actions. If I do something I need to accept or take whatever consequences come my way. Another example of Kuleana is taking action for my success in school!



Aloha Aku Aloha Mai
To give respect and receive respect


I live this by treating other people the way you want to be treated. I also believe this means to be respectful. An example of Aloha Aku and Aloha Mai is returning something that is borrowed to gain or keep trust.




Malama i Kekahi i Kekahi
To care and protect each other


I live this by taking care of my friends and caring for each other. Sometimes we do not malama our enemies. Some do and some don't. Our enemies are not always all bad. Sometimes they become our good friends.

Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Possible Project Idea & Resources We can Use

PPI
Where does gout come from?
What causes gout?
Who is likely to get gout?
Does gout have a more scientific name?
What can be done to prevent getting gout?


Resource found
Google Books
http://www.teachingamericanhistory.org

Friday, February 13, 2009

Cracked Mountain

Hakipu'u

Haki - Cracked

Pu'u - Mountains

and the winds coming from the sky and always striving for the highest.

from Uncle Cal citing the graphic designed by Uncle Kala.

Some thoughts

The pathway to school improvement is not paved with standardized tests.
since the 50's we've doing a lot of measuring.

School and Community leaders need to learn how to use assessment to improve schools.

True Hopelessness always trumps pressure to learn...

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2007/10/17/08stiggings.h27.html?print=1

4 day weekend, lab, projects, presentations, HSA testing...

Aloha Kakou,

Please enjoy your 4 day weekend with fun activities including project work. Please do not forget that we have Makai lab on Wednesday, February 18th.

Please dont forget what you need which includes:

Snorkel
Fins
Swim Clothes - appropriate
Dry Clothes to change in to.
Lunch
Notes for Makai Lab
Towel
and other things you might need.


Congrats to Kyle and Isaac for doing a successful presentation of Project-based learning to most of our staff of HLC.

And on the flip side over half our class did not bring their planners to class today. This is not a good indicator. Please use your planner to keep hours and plan what you are going to do.

Be safe and Malama Pono!

Aunty Charlene said, "You get what you measure" THINK ABOUT IT

KUMU FEKI

Friday, February 6, 2009

Aloha Haumana

After meeting with all of you this past week I would like to formalize the goals that we will have.

These are some of the goals I think we should focus on:

- COMPLETE AT LEAST ONE PROJECT BY MARCH 6TH, MAY 1ST, AND MAY 29TH, 2009
- COMPLETE 3 REQUIRED PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS BY MAY 29TH, 2009
- INVEST AN HOUR BEFORE OR AFTER SCHOOL TO WORK ON PROJECT WORK, LLE’S OR BOOK REPORTS.
- INVEST AN HOUR BEFORE OR AFTER SCHOOL TO WORK AND STUDY ON MATH.
- STRETCH MYSELF TO DO MORE IN MATH THAN I HAVE DONE IN THE RECENT MONTHS.
- FINISH AT LEAST TWO LLE’S (.10 CREDIT HOURS EACH -10 MAX PER SCHOOL YEAR) BY MARCH 6TH, MAY 1ST AND MAY 29TH, 2009
- FINISH AT LEAST ONE BOOK REPORT (.25 CREDIT HOURS) ON MARCH 6TH, MAY 1ST, AND MAY 29TH,2009
- USE MY PLANNER TO: 1.) PLAN MY HOMEWORK EVERYDAY, 2.) WRITE DOWN HOURS I SPEND ON PROJECT WORK OUTSIDE OF SCHOOL ALONG WITH A 3 SENTENCE DESCRIPTION OF WHAT I WAS DOING.
- BRING MY PLANNER, PROJECT BINDER, 2 PENCILS AND PENS AND PAPER/COMPOSITION BOOK AND OTHER MATERIALS TO SCHOOL EVERYDAY EVEN IF IT IS A DAY FOR PE OR LABS.
- NOT: 1.) SWEAR AT ANY TIME, 2.) HURT OR ENDANGER ANYONE MENTALLY, VERBALLY, OR PHYSICALLY.
- NOT: 1.) WEAR INAPPROPRIATE CLOTHING TO SCHOOL, 2.) CHEW OR POSSESS GUM IN THE OPEN.
- COME PREPARED FOR PE EVERY MONDAY WITH MY ATHLETIC GEAR AND A GOOD ATTITUDE.
- COME PREPARED FOR MAKAI LAB EVERY WEDNESDAY WITH NECESSARY GEAR, HOMEWORK AND ATTITUDE (IF YOU DO NOT COME PREPARED MORE THAN 3 TIMES, THERE WILL BE HEAVY CONSEQUENCES FOR THAT CHOICE.)
- BE PRO-ACTIVE AND REFUSE TO BE REACTIVE
- ACKNOWLEDGE ANY FEEDBACK BY SAYING “THANK YOU FOR YOUR FEEDBACK”
- COMMUNICATE TO UNCLE FEKI OR ANY STAFF MEMBER I TRUST, ANY ISSUES THAT ARE UNSAFE OR ARE KEEPING ME FROM WORKING EFFECTIVELY IN SCHOOL.
- BE RESPECTFUL TO OTHERS BY SPEAKING KINDLY TO AND ABOUT THEM.
- NOT ALLOW ANYTHING TO DISTRACT ME FROM FOCUSING ON MY WORK TO ACHIEVE MY GOAL.

On Monday I will meet with every student to formally choose two or three of the following goals, or another goal like it, and will focus on accomplishing it this semester. If the goal is accomplished, we can choose another item to work on.

Mahalo,
Kumu Feki
feki54@gmail.com

Iolani Palace Volunteer



Are you interested in becoming a volunteer?

If so, please feel free to contact our Volunteer Service Assistant, Tuesday through Saturday
at (808) 522-0821, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (HST), , or e-mail us at volunteer@iolanipalace.org.

Monday, February 2, 2009

Parent Teacher Conferences

Aloha,

I prefer to call it Student-Parent-Teacher conference because our students have the best idea of what they have done and what they need to do.

Basically, we are looking at what we have done and what we can do to move our students to the next grade level.

Here is a brief list of what we can get credit for here at HLC:
Projects, Math, LLE's, Electives, e2020 and Compass courses (other than math), Work from Kumu, Basic Skills Workshops, Book Reports, Summer Activities, Camp and Learning Papers.

I am still learning how all our students can best benefit from all the opportunities here at Hakipu'u Learning Center.

Sunday, February 1, 2009

LLE Requirements

2008 - 2009 Semester 2

LLE INFORMATION

Steps to Submitting an LLE
1. Participate in a 6-8 hour "experience." Experiences may include: visiting a new place, learning a new skill, exploring a new subject of interest, etc.
2. Recognize the value in that experience for your learning and grown and decide to write up an LLE!!! Hurray!!!
3. Write up a reflection paper on your experience. (Follow the guidelines given below.)
4. Jump on project foundry and under, PROJECTS and Write a Project Request, choose the Life Long Learning Experiences form.
5. Fill out the form, which includes uploading your reflection paper.
6. Submit the proposal.
(7. OPTIONAL: Turn into me a folder of any extra evidence which you've gathered: hand-written journals, collected post cards, photographs, notes taken, stuffed animals won, etc.)

Write-Up Guidelines
Include the following information in your write up:

Paragraph 1: Introduction
-Briefly explain WHEN the even took place, WHO was there, WHAT the even entailed, WHERE it took place, and HOW it went.

Paragraphs 4-6: Body of Paper
-Choose 4-6 of the following questions. For each question you choose, write a thourough and in-depth paragraph. GIVE ALL THE DETAILS POSSIBLE. THE MORE DETAILS YOU EXPLAIN TO US, THE BETTER YOUR CHANCES OF GETTING FULL CREDIT!!!
1. What was the most important thing you learned? How did this experience teach you this lesson?
2. What was the most challenging aspect of the experience?
3. How did this experience allow you to understand something differently?
4. How did this make you understand yourself, your family, or your community better?
5. How did this experience tie in with a specific Content Standard?
6. How were your multiple intelligences used, challenged, or developed?
7. How has this experience changed you forever?

Last Paragraph: Conclusion
-Summarize your feelings about the experience. Would you participate in something like this again? Would you recommend others to participate in that activity? Are you proud of the lessons you have learned?

Reflection Requirements - The nitty-gritty:
Font Size 12, double spaced. Have someone read and edit your write-up for proper grammar and punctuation before you turn it in.
7-8 graders: 500 words
9-10 graders: 600 words
11-12 graders: 700 words

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Text of President Obama's Inaugural Address


My fellow citizens:

I stand here today humbled by the task before us, grateful for the trust you have bestowed, mindful of the sacrifices borne by our ancestors. I thank President Bush for his service to our nation, as well as the generosity and cooperation he has shown throughout this transition.
Forty-four Americans have now taken the presidential oath. The words have been spoken during rising tides of prosperity and the still waters of peace. Yet, every so often the oath is taken amidst gathering clouds and raging storms. At these moments, America has carried on not simply because of the skill or vision of those in high office, but because we the people have remained faithful to the ideals of our forebears, and true to our founding documents.
So it has been. So it must be with this generation of Americans.
That we are in the midst of crisis is now well understood. Our nation is at war, against a far-reaching network of violence and hatred. Our economy is badly weakened, a consequence of greed and irresponsibility on the part of some, but also our collective failure to make hard choices and prepare the nation for a new age. Homes have been lost; jobs shed; businesses shuttered. Our health care is too costly; our schools fail too many; and each day brings further evidence that the ways we use energy strengthen our adversaries and threaten our planet.
These are the indicators of crisis, subject to data and statistics. Less measurable but no less profound is a sapping of confidence across our land — a nagging fear that America’s decline is inevitable, and that the next generation must lower its sights.
Today I say to you that the challenges we face are real. They are serious and they are many. They will not be met easily or in a short span of time. But know this, America — they will be met.
On this day, we gather because we have chosen hope over fear, unity of purpose over conflict and discord.
On this day, we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and false promises, the recriminations and worn out dogmas, that for far too long have strangled our politics.
We remain a young nation, but in the words of Scripture, the time has come to set aside childish things. The time has come to reaffirm our enduring spirit; to choose our better history; to carry forward that precious gift, that noble idea, passed on from generation to generation: the God-given promise that all are equal, all are free and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness.
In reaffirming the greatness of our nation, we understand that greatness is never a given. It must be earned. Our journey has never been one of shortcuts or settling for less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted — for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things — some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.
For us, they packed up their few worldly possessions and traveled across oceans in search of a new life.
For us, they toiled in sweatshops and settled the West; endured the lash of the whip and plowed the hard earth.
For us, they fought and died, in places like Concord and Gettysburg; Normandy and Khe Sanh.
Time and again these men and women struggled and sacrificed and worked till their hands were raw so that we might live a better life. They saw America as bigger than the sum of our individual ambitions; greater than all the differences of birth or wealth or faction.
This is the journey we continue today. We remain the most prosperous, powerful nation on Earth. Our workers are no less productive than when this crisis began. Our minds are no less inventive, our goods and services no less needed than they were last week or last month or last year. Our capacity remains undiminished. But our time of standing pat, of protecting narrow interests and putting off unpleasant decisions — that time has surely passed. Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America.
For everywhere we look, there is work to be done. The state of the economy calls for action, bold and swift, and we will act — not only to create new jobs, but to lay a new foundation for growth. We will build the roads and bridges, the electric grids and digital lines that feed our commerce and bind us together. We will restore science to its rightful place, and wield technology’s wonders to raise health care’s quality and lower its cost. We will harness the sun and the winds and the soil to fuel our cars and run our factories. And we will transform our schools and colleges and universities to meet the demands of a new age. All this we can do. All this we will do.
Now, there are some who question the scale of our ambitions — who suggest that our system cannot tolerate too many big plans. Their memories are short. For they have forgotten what this country has already done; what free men and women can achieve when imagination is joined to common purpose, and necessity to courage.
What the cynics fail to understand is that the ground has shifted beneath them — that the stale political arguments that have consumed us for so long no longer apply. The question we ask today is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works — whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. Where the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. Where the answer is no, programs will end. Those of us who manage the public’s dollars will be held to account — to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day — because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government.
Nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. Its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control — and that a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. The success of our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gross domestic product, but on the reach of our prosperity; on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart — not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to our common good.
As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our founding fathers ... our found fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience’s sake. And so to all the other peoples and governments who are watching today, from the grandest capitals to the small village where my father was born: know that America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman, and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity, and that we are ready to lead once more.
Recall that earlier generations faced down fascism and communism not just with missiles and tanks, but with sturdy alliances and enduring convictions. They understood that our power alone cannot protect us, nor does it entitle us to do as we please. Instead, they knew that our power grows through its prudent use; our security emanates from the justness of our cause, the force of our example, the tempering qualities of humility and restraint.
We are the keepers of this legacy. Guided by these principles once more, we can meet those new threats that demand even greater effort — even greater cooperation and understanding between nations. We will begin to responsibly leave Iraq to its people, and forge a hard-earned peace in Afghanistan. With old friends and former foes, we will work tirelessly to lessen the nuclear threat, and roll back the specter of a warming planet. We will not apologize for our way of life, nor will we waver in its defense, and for those who seek to advance their aims by inducing terror and slaughtering innocents, we say to you now that our spirit is stronger and cannot be broken; you cannot outlast us, and we will defeat you.
For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus — and non-believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this Earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.
To the Muslim world, we seek a new way forward, based on mutual interest and mutual respect. To those leaders around the globe who seek to sow conflict, or blame their society’s ills on the West — know that your people will judge you on what you can build, not what you destroy. To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.
To the people of poor nations, we pledge to work alongside you to make your farms flourish and let clean waters flow; to nourish starved bodies and feed hungry minds. And to those nations like ours that enjoy relative plenty, we say we can no longer afford indifference to the suffering outside our borders; nor can we consume the world’s resources without regard to effect. For the world has changed, and we must change with it.
As we consider the road that unfolds before us, we remember with humble gratitude those brave Americans who, at this very hour, patrol far-off deserts and distant mountains. They have something to tell us, just as the fallen heroes who lie in Arlington whisper through the ages. We honor them not only because they are guardians of our liberty, but because they embody the spirit of service; a willingness to find meaning in something greater than themselves. And yet, at this moment — a moment that will define a generation — it is precisely this spirit that must inhabit us all.
For as much as government can do and must do, it is ultimately the faith and determination of the American people upon which this nation relies. It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break, the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter’s courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke, but also a parent’s willingness to nurture a child, that finally decides our fate.
Our challenges may be new. The instruments with which we meet them may be new. But those values upon which our success depends — hard work and honesty, courage and fair play, tolerance and curiosity, loyalty and patriotism — these things are old. These things are true. They have been the quiet force of progress throughout our history. What is demanded then is a return to these truths. What is required of us now is a new era of responsibility — a recognition, on the part of every American, that we have duties to ourselves, our nation, and the world, duties that we do not grudgingly accept but rather seize gladly, firm in the knowledge that there is nothing so satisfying to the spirit, so defining of our character, than giving our all to a difficult task.
This is the price and the promise of citizenship.
This is the source of our confidence — the knowledge that God calls on us to shape an uncertain destiny.
This is the meaning of our liberty and our creed — why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent Mall, and why a man whose father less than sixty years ago might not have been served at a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath.
So let us mark this day with remembrance, of who we are and how far we have traveled. In the year of America’s birth, in the coldest of months, a small band of patriots huddled by dying campfires on the shores of an icy river. The capital was abandoned. The enemy was advancing. The snow was stained with blood. At a moment when the outcome of our revolution was most in doubt, the father of our nation ordered these words be read to the people:
“Let it be told to the future world ... that in the depth of winter, when nothing but hope and virtue could survive...that the city and the country, alarmed at one common danger, came forth to meet (it).”
America, in the face of our common dangers, in this winter of our hardship, let us remember these timeless words. With hope and virtue, let us brave once more the icy currents, and endure what storms may come. Let it be said by our children’s children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter; and with eyes fixed on the horizon and God’s grace upon us, we carried forth that great gift of freedom and delivered it safely to future generations.
Thank you. God bless you. And God bless the United States of America.

Inauguration Day

Aloha Kakou,

Some of our 'ohana today saw some of the events in the Inauguration Parade and saw replays of President Obama's inauguration speech. Others of us continue to work on our projects.

If you witnessed the events today, please do further research to write an LLE or Lifelong Learning Experience which can award you .10 credits.

In our reading of the book The Pigman, we read about Lorraine and John going to the zoo with Mr. Pignati and their experiences with monkeys and other animals.

Overall, it was a good day, with also being introduced to classical music in the classroom. Hopefully we can listen to Hawaiian instrumental music and others. There was a request for Reggae, but we'll have to look into that.

Some of our students do not bring their supplies for school, so please make sure your students come prepared especially with the following:

pencils/pens
writing paper
erasers
notebook
folders for project work (or other classes)
planner (issued by the school and a replacement for $6)


Mahalo,
Kumu Feki

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Just In: School in Session Thurs. Jan. 15

We have school tomorrow! Aunty Gloria just informed me we will have school tomorrow!

Aloha,
Kumu Feki

Lab Day Today!

Aloha Kakou!

We had a great lab day today building up the dam and pulling weeds in the lo'i kalo. Mahalo for all the hard work that was done by the 9 students that were able to go to lab. It was great learning from Uncle Cal. We also loved having Uncle Glenn and our new EA, Kainoa.

There is a possibility that our school may be closed tomorrow due to a storm system set to come in tomorrow. Please expect phone calls from me, and if nothing else, please be aware of any announcements that will be made on the radio, television, or on the internet.

Kumu Feki

Sunday, January 11, 2009

Enjoy Your Last Day of Winter Break...

Aloha Haumana,

Tomorrow I will be at HLC in meetings and preparing for Tuesday, when we shall meet again.

Please be prepared to come to school ready to learn and work. Ma Ka Hana Ka 'Ike!

We learn by doing.

Please ho'omakaukau!

Kumu Feki


Email me if you need assistance!
kumufeki@gmail.com

Friday, January 9, 2009

See you in a few days...

Aloha,

Just to remind all of you that school resumes on Tuesday, the 13th of January, 2009.

Hope all is going well for you in the new year. I look forward to working hard with each of you.

me ka 'oia'i'o,
Kumu Feki

Thursday, January 8, 2009

Back to School on Tuesday!

Aloha Haumana,

Please be aware that we will have school back in session on Tuesday, January 13th, 2009.

Please do all you can to set yourself up for success.

Kumu Feki

Keahiakahoe

E 'Ulumua Kakou!
Let us find our way forward together!
 
(c) free template